Money Matters

It’s been well said time and time again that money is like a microscope; magnifying what is really inside of us. In other words, when something affects our wallet, our reaction often reveals our heart. Are we generous where God has called us to be? Are we eager to meet the needs of others? Are we content in seasons of little and faithful during seasons of plenty? These are the questions that we ought to ask; trusting the Holy Spirit to convict and shape us through the Word.

In the Gospels, an average of one out of every 10 verses deals with money. Luke’s Gospel leads the way with the more talk of money than all the other Synoptic Gospels. Clearly, Jesus wanted us to be well-informed when it comes to how we manage money. As you and I seek to be teachable stewards under the sanctifying chisel of the Holy Spirit, Luke’s Gospel can be a great place to turn for guidance.

Here are several principles for money management from Luke, along with references for further study.

Followers of Jesus march to different beat when it comes to money

Even before Jesus arrived, John the Baptist was announcing His arrival and declaring that followers of the Lamb of God would be called to a renewed way of living — and giving. The Baptist called for the “fruit of repentance” (Luke 3:8) and when asked, “Then what shall we do?” (3:10) he told them to share food and clothing (3:11), conduct business with integrity (3:12-13), and if they were in powerful positions to be content refrain from monetary exploitation (3:14). This is different.

Guard your heart against greed

From the parable of the soils and the thorny snare of riches and pleasure (Luke 8:14), to the rich young ruler who couldn’t stand the thought of choosing Christ over cash (18:18-25), we must guard our hearts against greed (12:13-15). It’s a trap with eternal ramifications.

Earthly security is not a sign of spiritual security

Jesus didn’t mince words when He asked, “For what is a man profited if he gains the whole world, and loses or forfeits himself?” (Luke 9:25). You can have all this world but still not have the One who holds the world. Building bigger barns and fattening your soul with the comforts of this fleeting world guarantees nothing with God. For God Himself said, “You fool! This very night your soul is required of you; and now who will own what you have prepared?” (12:20).

Giving money doesn’t make up for a lifestyle of disobedience

The Pharisees were experts at external righteousness — but Jesus had some bad news for these seemingly good, religious experts. In Luke 11:42 Jesus warns, “But woe to you Pharisees! For you pay tithe of mint and rue and every kind of garden herb, and yet disregard justice and the love of God; but these things you should have done without neglecting the others.” Jesus calls His followers to give generously but never is that a “get out of jail free” card concerning sin, injustice, and shallow religiosity.

Where your treasure is, there your heart is

The world chases physical security as though it will preserve them spiritually. On their way to achieving temporal security they worry until medications control their anxiety. In the race of life, to have is to win — and many die trying. Those with the most boast of being the master of their destiny; the captain of their soul. Jesus targets the heart of humankind declaring, “For where you treasure is, there will your heart be also” (Luke 12:34). The words of Martin Luther are fitting here: “Whatever your heart clings to and confides in, that is really your God.” Christian, do not fear for your Father has chosen gladly to give you the kingdom (12:32). Seek it! All else will fall into place according to His will (12:31).

Big offerings don’t necessarily mean big sacrifice

If a billionaire gives $10,000 dollars and a broke widow gives $10, what does God see? In Luke 21:1-4 Jesus squares up the wealthy as they arrogantly put their large gifts into the treasury. Their show of generosity was just that — a show. Then, in the midst of their pompous display a humble widow comes forward. I doubt few even noticed but Jesus certainly did. Christ’s words dropped like an anvil of conviction; melting their haughty hearts. He said, “Truly I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all of them; for they all out of their surplus put into the offering; but she out of her poverty put in all that had to live on” (21:3-4).

Death is the great equalizer for both the rich and the poor

Jesus was teaching His disciples about money one day and told the story about a rich man and Lazarus. Lazarus was but a poor man who ate the crumbs off the rich man’s table and lay by his gate; helplessly left in his poverty (Luke 19:21). Eventually, the rich man would die in his fine robes and poor Lazarus in his rags (16:22-23). One would go to heaven, the other into Hades. From this sobering glimpse of life beyond the grave we learn that death is the great equalizer.The rich and the poor will one day share the same end. From his agony and torment in Hades the rich man cried out for just a drop of water for his burning tongue (Luke 16:24). Father Abraham — who held Lazarus closely in heavenly paradise — responds saying, “Child, remember that during your life you received your good things, and likewise Lazarus bad things; but now he is being comforted here, and you are in agony” (16:25). On judgment day, it won’t matter how much you possessed on earth but Whom you possessed. Those who by grace have Christ shall have life, and life more abundantly.

It’s human nature to view money as a false sense of security. May the words of Jesus from the Gospel of Luke be a Spirit-inspired reminder to master our money for His glory and kingdom’s gain.

4 replies
  1. Julia Pomeroy
    Julia Pomeroy says:

    I had a pretty awful childhood but there is one thing I am grateful for and that is my adopted mother was incredibly acquisitive wanting things all the time which prepared me long before I knew Jesus. Now everything I have I only have because God has given it to me and it is all really His so if He wants me to give whatever to somebody else then I will because it is not mine! That includes photographs, pets, bed, whatever and the little money we have! Therefore I feel sorry or those who find this concept difficult. I have known my Lord for 43+ years and I have not been left hungry, homeless or naked and there has always been food in the fridge for the next day and extra clothes. Yes, I would love to be able to go away some time but He knows my needs and He will provide when He considers it is good for me to have a holiday. In the meantime I thank Him for everything, even the toilet. I know this might sound strange but when I was a child if we wished to use the toilet we had to walk down to the bottom of the cobbled yard to a shared toilet and it was not fun if it was raining or snowing. To be able to go to my bathroom and use the facilities we have there which are only used by my family is sheer unadultered joy!

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